Thursday, February 03, 2011

Homemade Backyard Swings

(c) 2011 by Tom King

I love swings despite my checkered history with them.  When I was in elementary school and weighed not much more than a mid-sized cannonball, I took to launching myself for distance from the formidable steel and wood swingset on the Keene Public School playground. I was small then and fearless and could outdistance anybody in my classroom, even the older kids.  I was already developing theories about trajectory and experimenting with an early release strategy that propelled my skinny self out to distances that outstripped my opponents by five to ten feet.  I had discovered, just as military scientist and engineer, Niccolo Tartaglia, had  during the Rennaisance, that the optimum angle of initial takeoff was 45 degrees. Therefore if I parted company with the swing halfway to the apex of the swing's arc, I could add significant distance to my jump.

I was light and the grass in front of the swing was thick and deep, so I managed not to break anything. The swing's seats were solid wooden two by sixes, which, though capable of giving you a broken nose or concussion, were really easy to jump out of. Sadly, insurers these days require us to use those rubber, butt-hugging flexi-seats on the grounds that they won't knock children unconscious who walk in front of them. I believe this leads to children being less careful about what they walk in front of, but I do understand the safety people's concerns. 

That said, here's how to make a nice two seater swing.  Make it a little wider and give yourself about five feet of clearance between the swing and the posts and you can play a nifty game with the kids called "Cut the Butter".  (I'll describe how that's played sometime in a later post, in case you missed it growing up).

First thing you need to do is dig two holes about 15 feet apart with a post hole digger. The holes should be at least three feet deep. Site the holes so that there are no obstructions within 15 feet of the swings in all directions.  I like to have a good 20 feet in case you get a jumper...


Dig the bottom of the hole wider than the top. Do this by angling the attack of the post hole digger so that you cut out a bell shaped bottom for each hole as shown in the drawing to the left.






Insert the posts in the holes. Turn them so they are squared with one another. The posts should be six by six posts and 10 to 12 feet long or longer depending on how tall you want your swings. Buy pressure treated posts. You want this swing to last a long time and be safe for the kids to use. Always over-engineer where playground equipment is concerned.


Lift the posts and pour pea gravel around the base - about 2 inches below the bottom of the post so each sits on top of a layer of gravel and then another 4 inches around the base as shown at the left.




Mix up concrete in a wheelbarrow. Depending on how deep and wide you dug the post hole you could need two or three bags of concrete mix. The more you use, the more stable your post will be. Fill the hole to about 4 to 6 inches below ground level.






Allow the whole thing to sit for at least 24 hours for the concrete to thoroughly cure. Fill the rest of the hole with dirt and pack it down tightly.








Clamp a 2 by 8 inch pressure treated board to one side of the two support posts as shown on the right. Get a couple of large Vice Grips (TM) clamps.  You'll be so glad you have them. They are well worth buying just for this project. Another way to do it is to hold them in place with a nail on either end till you drill the bolt holes.



Clamp or nail a second 2 by 8 on the opposite side of the upright so the posts are sandwiched between the ends of cross members. The longer the 2 by 8's the more clearance you can give the swings to the sides. Kids WILL try swinging around in circles, so the more you can do to keep them from wrapping themselves around a pole the better. 

Drill 5/8 inch holes through the ends of the cross-members and the posts. Insert a ten inch long 5/8 inch carriage bolt and flat washer through the holes and bolt them in place with a flat washer, lock washer and nut.

Cut four 8 inch long pieces of six by six post. Tap them into place between the cross members and clamp or nail them in place.  You will attach the eye bolts through the blocks for the swing chains.  Each pair of blocks should be two and a half feet apart for the swings. Center the blocks for the two swings between the posts with 3 feet of clearance between them.

You can also use a three foot long 6 by 6 instead of two shorter ones. It makes it easier to place the support bolts and vertical eyes through the blocks without drilling them too close to each other. For an even sturdier solution run a 6x6 the length of the gap between the cross members. That sucker ain't goin' nowhere. Space the long carriage bolts between the vertical eye-bolts for the swing. Costs a little more with that much lumber up top, but then, peace of mind always costs a bit more!

Drill a half inch hole through the cross-members and the wooden support blocks.  Offset the holes a half inch from center to allow room for the eyebolt to pass.  Bolt the blocks in place. If you haven't nailed the block into place, drive a pair of nails through the cross-member into the post opposite the side the carriage bolt is on.



Drill a half inch hole vertically through chain support blocks. Offset the hole an inch from the carriage bolt through the chain support blocks. Push each ten inch long, half inch carriage bolt through a flat washer and through the vertical holes in the blocks and screw a half inch screw-on threaded eye bolt onto the end of the carriage bolts. 



Hang the swing assemblies on the eye bolts.  You can buy swing seats with chains at big box stores, discount houses and home improvement stores.  They come complete with chains and hooks and can be hung right out of the package.

You are ready to go.  Simply add kids.

P.S.:  I forgot to include a materials list. This bad boy will look nice and last nearly forever, but the materials can add up.  I scrounged a lot of my timbers.  I used some long scrap timbers I found from a demolition project on an old building. I got them cheap and they gave us a rustic look. I had to sand the splinters away and seal with a heavy clearcoat because it was on a children's playground, but it looked good and still saved me money.  Anyway, here's the list -

MATERIALS:

2 treated timbers, 6 by 6 inches by 12 feet
Pea gravel
5 bags concrete mix
2 treated boards, 2 by 8 by 16 feet You can use
4 pieces of treated timber, 6 by 6 inches by 8 inch or two three foot long six by sixes
1 Box 16d nails
6 Carriage bolts, 5/8 by 10 inches long
12 flat washers, 5/8
6 nuts, 5/8
4 Screw-on half inch threaded eyes with half inch carriage bolts, 10 inches long
2 Swing, chain and hook assemblies

TOOLS:
 
Post hole diggers
Wheelbarrow, shovel and water hose
Circular Saw
Large Vice- Grip (tm) C-clamps
Drill and bits
Hammer

COST:

When I built this thing, I over-engineered the heck out of it because it was going up on a day care center playground. That makes it more expensive, but also longer lasting and sturdier. My license rep was skeptical that I could pass safety inspection with a homemade wooden swing, but I did. I recessed all the bolt heads for added safety. You can do that with a paddle bit to avoid people catching themselves on the bolt heads, but for this swing, the bolt heads are out of reach so unless you want to do it for aesthetic purposes, it really isn't necessary. My license rep was impressed anyway.

The swing chains and seats can be purchased complete. You can get the cheap ones at Wal-Mart for not very much and just hang them when you've finished building your swing - easy peasy. If you want the heavy rubber belted industrial strength swing seats, you can order those on-line from a playground supply company and they do get pricey.  If you want to go traditional, you can cut a seat out of a 2 by 6 or 2 by 8, bolt U-bolts into the ends and hang it from chains with "S" hooks.  Just bend the U-bolts in the center to make a sharp "V" shape so the seat doesn't slip and dump the rider.

Caution: I like the wood seats, but with kids around you have to be very careful with them. Wooden seats can whack the little ones in the heads and cause concussions, lost teeth, black eyes and all manner of head trauma. I waited till mine got older before I put in a wooden seat. I went to wood mainly because their mama loves to swing and doesn't like the rubber sling seats (too constricting). I would never put wooden swing seats on a playground where kids are unsupervised or only minimally watched.

With scrounged material I spent about $100 building this one back in 1987.  With careful shopping you should be able to do it for a little more than twice that nowadays if you shop carefully.  The big cost will be the six by sixes.  You can do it with 4 by 4 uprights, but they will tend to flex more and can work themselves loose in the ground, so you'd best dig a larger base hole and put in more concrete if you use smaller timbers. I stuck with the larger timbers because my family are very large Texans and we like to swing high!

With costs for building materials skyrocketing, the best way to figure the costs for this is to carry the materials list down to Lowes and check prices. Also check old downtown building demolition projects. They sometimes tear out big old solid beams that have been cured indoors for ages. If you know someone involved in the project, they might give them to you for a good price. You can treat recycled beams yourself with outdoor wood treatment and spray on water seal. If you have time, you might want to hold off on your project a few months till you find the right wood for the project. I love aged wood anyway and for outdoor garden projects, it can really give you a stunning effect.

Hope this helps. Good luck with your project. It's worth the effort and cost, I promise.

A backyard swing is good for the soul. There have been scientific studies.

Tom

Here's a diagram for how to recess the bolts and nuts to prevent injury to the kids. Once the bolts are tight, cut off any excess even with the top of the nut or bolt head. Use a hacksaw or saws-all with a metal cutting blade to cut off the bolt. Use a file to smooth any jagged edges.


Reader Dave sent me this picture and the following description of his version of this swing.

Hi Tom,

Here's the photo of your swing set design that I built last summer.  I was going for tall, so I used 16' 6x6's for the uprights, and 16' 2x8's for the beam, with three sections of 6x6 sandwiched between.  I would like to have gotten the posts buried a foot deeper, but did the best I could with a manual post hole digger in rocky clay.  There are several hundred pounds of concrete around each base, hopefully compensating some for the depth.  (It moves a small amount while in use, but I can't decide if it's really moving at the base, or whether those uprights are actually long enough to flex a little.)  I didn't have a helper so I bolted the beam together on the ground and used a couple inexpensive block and tackle setups to raise it into position and bolt it in place.  The toughest part was digging those holes and mixing dozens of bags of cement.  I would not look forward to doing that again!

All that being said, it's just a backyard set for my kids, and unless one of those 6x6's snaps, I can't see it coming apart.  I know there are easier ways to do a swing set, but I really like the aesthetics of this one, and the kids love the long swings.  I spaced the chain hangers such that it can be set up multiple ways:  three swings with adequate clearance, two swings with massive clearance, or one big porch swing in the middle if we gear down once the kids are grown.

We hope it stands the test of time.  Thanks again for the idea.

Best regards,
Dave

Author's Note:  I expect Dave's swing will stand for a good long time. I really like the wooden caps he put on top of the uprights. Gives the swing a finished look.  - Tom







 


61 comments:

  1. My husband & I have been looking for swing plans & we think yours will be perfect.
    Can you estimate what you spent on this project?

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  2. I added a materials list and discussion of cost to the article. Hope that helps. Costs vary widely depending on how good a scrounger you are. Six by sixes are expensive, but you can sometimes find good deals in salvage yards or at demolition sites. You can make it less expensively with two A-frame set landscape timbers on each end, instead of the single uprights, but I like the way this one looks in a garden better. That's just me. Hope this works for you and good luck with your swing. I've never met anyone who added a garden swing to their yard who regretted it. Swinging is good for the soul. I helped our senior class at college build one with telephone poles and 2 by 10's. The thing had a heck of an arc to it!

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  3. Tom, I'm a shade tree mechanic, fix-it guy and back porch inventor as well. It seems I put off building my kids' swing set all this time so as to give you the time to post your plans. Thank you in advance. I'll be building this one in the near future. Appreciate the non-A-frame footprint. The moving swings still take up the same yard space but it's nice to have less on the lawn in a small yard. Will shoot you a pic when the build is done. Thanks again -Ted in VT

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  4. I'm looking forward to seeing your work. I'm currently looking for an excuse to build a swing set down at the neighborhood playground. They didn't put any in when they built it. It seems swings have been banished by insurance companies as a bad deal for kids, so they leave them out. How sad is that? Our solution is to put them up and don't ask. It's easier to get forgiveness than permission. Besides who leaves their kids unattended on a playground these days anyway?

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  5. Tom, I'm with you. Easier to ask for forgiveness later. Sad for kids and sad to let insurance companies shape our culture in general- in so many ways. Plus, kids need to get whacked with a swing, etc. Builds character.

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    1. Ted, I got your note about the swings. I'd love to see the pictures of your completed project and post them here for people to see. I wrote right back, but for some reason your email account that I replied to had disappeared. I figured I'd post here where you can find it. You can send me the photos of your new swings as attachments to your email at twayneking@gmail.com , Looking forward to seeing the pics.

      Tom

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  6. Love your website. We are wanting to build a similar swingset that is strong enough for adults to swing on. What is the weight limit for your swingset?

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  7. I am wondering, would 3 swings be too close together for this one?

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  8. For grownups no. For kids, I'd worry about them crashing together. My day care licensing rep would not have approved. It's designed to meet their clearance requirements and then some.

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  9. Tom Everett wrote to ask if I'd ever had any problem with the cross beam sagging over time.
    If you put a pair of 2 by 8's up there and screw them together via those center blocks, you have what is essentially a 4 by 8 beam. This thing is over-engineered for strength. The original was originally built on a playground. I don't think you'll have trouble. If, for some reason down the years, it does sag, you can always mount a 4 by 4 in the center for support, but I hardly think you'll ever need it. Once you add the blocks between the two beams, you should see the whole thing stiffen up.

    The cross beam is pretty heavy, so make sure you put enough concrete around the uprights.
    Oh and If anybody has a picture of one of these things that they've built, please send it to me at twayneking@gmail.com. I'd love to post it here.

    Tom

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  10. If anyone IS concerned about the center beam's strength, you can use 2-by-12's, but I'd go to 8-by-8's for the uprights. You could support a hippopotamus from something like that.

    Tom

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  11. Hi Tom,

    Thank you for making these plans available, this will be perfect for our small backyard. My question is how do you hold the post level through concrete setting process (obviously, we have limited building experience.

    Thank you
    Lisa

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  12. One way to keep the post level would be to drive nails in the sides of the posts and push 2x4s or a handy length of pipe or something up against the post using the nails as a brace to hold it vertical while the concrete sets. I tied ropes from the top of the post to three nearby trees and adjusted the tension till the post was vertical, then poured in the concrete. Anything that holds the post vertical will work.

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  13. Thank you for your reply, we are getting ready to build this weekend. We will send you some pics.

    Cheers

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  14. I look forward to seeing the result.

    Tom

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  15. Hi Tom, thanks for posting the plans and description. A couple of questions: 1) No rocking even with a 200lb or so adult on the swing? 2) I've read that wooden posts (even pressure treated) in concrete is nto a good idea because the concrete holds moisture in and you get post rot. Any problems in this regard for the 1987 swing?
    Thanks

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  16. This bad boy is solid. I weigh 250 plus and it didn't rock with me. It's really over-engineered. The concrete does hold moisture if you just stick the post in and concrete seals the bottom of the hole (no place to drain out). Notice, however, that I give specific instructions for adding a layer of pea gravel in the bottom of the hole so that the post sits in the gravel where it can drain water out into the soil which absorbs it and it doesn't get sealed up with concrete. Do it just like the instructions and the post will last for ages. If you want it stronger just use a bigger post.

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  17. I'm about to try this in a toddler playground at a licensed center. Wish me luck and thanks for all of the info!

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  18. Hi! I've read a couple of your post's in the last few minutes. They're great! Thank you soooo much for showing how do to things DIY style.

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  19. Nice directions...you said this swing is over engineered...I have a couple of 4 x 6's would these work for the uprights? I would put them in the ground so the 6" is front to back. I laughed out loud when I read the part about "cut the butter", thanks!

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  20. Tracy, as long as you don't have a couple of 300 pounders playing "Cut the Butter" on it, you'd probably be okay with a couple of lighter weight cross members. With cross braces it's an 8x6 beam pretty much. Like I said, I over-engineererd. I'm a nervous Nellie where these things are concerned.

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  21. This is just what I was looking for and hopefully I will soon have some pics to send you!!! But because of the incredible cost of the 6x6 here near Vail I am planning on something similar but with double 4x4's on each end and a cross beam of 4x8 x 14 ft. I am researching like crazy everywhere possible and you seem like the most knowledgeable ;)
    The 4x4 s are 16 feet long because I wanted something tall (just took down a commercial one that was getting old in the backyard) and I plan to dig 4 feet holes to bury them. Question - do you think this is going to be stable enough? Or am I crazy and should I make the swingset shorter? (kiddos are 8 and 10)
    Thank you Tom!!!

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    1. This is the design I was hoping to do, do you have any final photos or issues with the design?

      http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-image-child-swing-set-outdoor-park-image25817976

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    2. Nothing we havent covered here. You can play with the design to suit your needs. I don't have any photos. I built this for a daycare we ran out of our home 20 years ago and 2500 miles away from where I am now, so no photos. Sorry.

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  22. Monika, that should work. I'd put 4x8 blocks between each of the 4x4 upright pairs about halfway up and run a long bolt or all-thread rod through the uprights and the block and bolt them together to stiffen the uprights. Recess the heads of the nuts for safety as shown in the diagram I just added to the bottom of the article. The trick to stability is to dig the holes for the uprights wider at the bottom than at the top as shown in the diagram. That's where the stability comes from is that deep wide base. If you ever have to dig the posts up it's gonna be a bear, but its a small price to pay for safety.

    Love to see those pics.

    Tom

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  23. Thank you so much Tom for your excellent idea on the 8x4 block! You are the guru of swing sets ;) I will post a pic in about 2 weeks after my Herculean cousins come up for the digging and swinging! Your assistance is invaluable and I want to let you know how much I appreciative it, safe kids are happier kids!

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  24. Hi Tom. I've build a swing set similar to your own, I just have one cross beam so 3 posts in total. Unfortunately I have quite a lot if movement in the structure when swinging. The posts are 3metres with 1 meter in the ground. I put 2 bags of cement in each hole but didn't use a post digger so the whole was much bigger. I was thinking of adding 2 more bags of cement to each hole - there is sufficient depth or should I just add some kind of a-frame support which I was hoping to avoid in the first place? Thanks in Advance for any suggestions.

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  25. If you make the hole with a shovel it tends to be wider at the top than at the bottom. This makes the concrete bowl-shaped and it will rock back and forth in the hole. You'll have to put a lot of concrete around the hole to solve that problem. Either than or move the posts and dig the hole as shown in the diagram. A lot of people have that problem. You need more concrete around the bottom of the hole than at the top.

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  26. Hi Tom!
    Not sure if my last question posted or not. Could you add a third upright and a second set of swings to this? I'd position the 2nd set of 2x8's just below the first, taking 8-10" off the height, and have room for a baby swing and an additional swing for smaller children or a bench type swing. Could that center post handle all that?
    Thanks!!

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    1. Ought to work fine if you're using 6x6's or telephone poles for uprights and you dig the base holes correctly. Making the holes wider at the bottom than at the top is the secret to a stable base. Your idea for extending the swing and making one for smaller kids is very clever. Send me a picture of it if you build it. - Tom

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  27. Would this work as a rig for the new aerial yoga hammock rigs?

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  28. If you can hang it from the cross beam, it should work. You can also hang a porch swing from it or even a hammock.

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  29. Tom-

    I found this picture of a swing set similar to the one you describe, do you think it would be strong and safe? I plan to use 4x6x12 beam with the four posts being 4x6x12 also going 4' cemented into the ground below the frost line. I plan to mount two standard swings and one trapeze/rings bar. What do you think? Website is below:

    http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-image-child-swing-set-outdoor-park-image25817976

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    1. I'd use eye bolts all the way through instead of eye screws for the swing chain mounts to prevent them from pulling out due to the constant movement of the swings and constant moving pressure on the eyes that support the swing. Of course that's six good size holes all the way through the cross beam, but if you use a 4x6 you'll get a stronger beam, so it probably won't matter.

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  30. I have a question about the 2x8 cross beams. You show them as 2x8x16 but was wondering what your thoughts were if I were to drop it down to 2x8x12 with 2 swings?

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  31. The thing you want to be careful about is side clearance. I built mine with room to play "cut the butter" and other dangerous games of that sort. If the swing is not terribly tall and mostly it's small kids using it, you may have plenty of clearance. You just don't want it to be easy for a larger kid pushing a smaller kid into the support post. Figure how much clearance you'll have for safety. The taller the swing, the more side clearance you'll need.

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  32. Home made fun, for your little ones. :)

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  33. Hey Tom, thanks for this wonderful Backyard Swing tutorial! It's just what I was looking for. My husband and I (okay maybe just me haha) have been wanting to build a swing set in the backyard. We have a smaller yard and don't want to take up the entire space with a jumbo Playset. So I am thinking a small playhouse and an awesome swing like this will do the job! I was wondering if anyone ever sent you a picture of their completed Swing? I know I saw a few people above mention they were going to do the project and send you a pic. Thanks! :)

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  34. We built a two part playhouse for our day care center. It was a log house to which we bolted a crossbeam to a post we set to one side. Here's the link for the log cabin. it has spaces between the logs so you can always see what's going on inside for safety and it makes it easier to build. There's a diagram of the log playhouse. We used inexpensive landscape timbers to build it. The think is incredibly sturdy. More than 25 day care kids playing on it every day couldn't dent it. I have some pictures of the house and swing combo, but they are in a big box and I never managed to get them all digitized yet. If I do, I'll post them here.

    http://howdyyadewit.blogspot.com/2013/08/landscape-timber-playhouse.html#.VwVVdTEwBD1

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  35. Tom,

    I am going to build this swing in June. We have another boy on the way in August (will make 2 total) and I want to be able to enjoy swinging high as well. I plan to set 2 6x6x16 3ft deep for the posts. Use 2 2x8x16s for the top, and slide in that 15ft 6x6 you had mentioned for the beam. I would like to fit in a 3rd swing (as we plan to have 3 kids total). Do you have any suggestions to offer?

    Thanks,

    Geoff

    PS how does one play cut the butter?

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  36. I am getting ready to make this swing for my daughters. Thank you for a very useful blog post! I am debating making the posts a little taller than what is in the plans. I could use 16 foot 6x6s and keep 10 feet above grade. Do you think making the swing taller would make it too wobbly? Any feedback about whether an 8 foot height is sufficient for older kids / adults? Your input is appreciated!
    Thanks,
    Joe from Canada

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  37. As heavy as the uprights are, you shouldn't have too much trouble, so long as you have enough concrete around the base. You might make it a little deeper in order to compensate for the leverage of the taller uprights. This thing is pretty well over-engineered so it should take some modification.

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    1. Thanks Tom - I appreciate the reply and information. If we keep it at the 8 foot height (using a 12 foot 6x6 and burying it four feet) ... can adults use the swing?

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  38. It's designed to handle grownups because big old kids are going to use it whether you tell them to or not.

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    1. Awesome - thank you! I will build it per your plan then.

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  39. The timber I had planned to use is 3X9 but after reading this I'm worried that the vertices might not be strong enough. What is your opinion? Thanks

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    1. Two of those bolted together would probably make a nice crossmember, but for the uprights, I'd use at least a 4x4 or 6x6.

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  40. Tom, Just what I've been looking for. However, I'm worried about digging through the chunks of quartz rock in the clay soil of my property. Any other options for digging the holes besides a post hole digger--say some sort of gas operated drill from a equipment rental establishment?. Also, on another do-it-yourself site someone seemed to authoritatively state that the swing's motion would eventually sheer the vertical wooden uprights, making a braced frame the only viable option. I'd like your thoughts on this. Thanks, Pete

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  41. Pete, you can rent a post hole digger easily enough. The trick is digging straight down and then carving out the hole wider at the bottom than at the top.

    If the posts are heavy enough, you don't have to worry much about much about them sheering off. This is backyard use, not public playground use. If the kids are using it and it is used by an adult or two is relatively gentle, I can't see you ever having a problem. A braced frame is cheaper and uses lighter weight lumber. Even then, the wooden frames eventually break down from weathering. Treat the wooden members with water seal every year or so. Seasonally tighten the bolts. Should last you for quite a while.

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  42. I’ll probably be returning to read through more,
    thanks for this post !!
    best baby swing -top rated Baby Swings.

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  43. building this this weekend. 6x6x12 post and hanging a porch swing around a firepit..I hope it comes out as planned..

    Joe

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  44. It shouldn't be a problem. Just make it a little stronger than you think it has to be.

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  45. Hi Tom, Thanks for the inspiration. I actually built a version of your swingset for my kids last summer. If there's any way to post a photo on here, I'd be happy to share a picture of the completed project. Thanks, Dave

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  46. Send your photo to twayneking@gmail.com. I'd be happy to post it on the blog.

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  47. Replies
    1. Might have ended up in your spam folder. Take care, Dave

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  48. I got it. It's tacked onto the end of the article

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  49. Is this strong enough for adults as well us plus 11 yr olds about 800 lbs....we have 10x10 railway ties could use or is that overkill ��

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    1. It should do, but if you've got 10x10's I'm a strong believer in over-engineering, especially with kids. Just make sure to secure the bases of the uprights with extra concrete so it doesn't rock in the hole. I'd love to see a picture of that when you're done.

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  50. Thank you for the detailed swingset plan! We built this swingset this weekend for my 12 year old who loves to swing as high as she can. She has outgrown both her rainbow swingset and Lifetime swing set. We spent $280 in materials which is cheap considering this swing set is far superior to her previous ones. As my husband put it "we just upgraded her to a race car, now we're really in trouble". One question: The swing set does sway a little when swinging at a high rate of speed. Is this normal? We used 2 1/2 bags of quick set concrete per post. My husband flared out the bottom of the holes per instructions. Perhaps it's due to the type of concrete we used? Is there anything you would reccomend or is it normal for the swing set to sway a little at a high rate of speed? Thank you again for taking the time to share your well engineered plan!

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